David Jackmanson (beeefcake) wrote,
David Jackmanson
beeefcake

Catch the Fire leader implies attacks on Indian students are from within Indian community

The leader of Catch The Fire Ministries, Danny Nasralla Nalliah, strongly implies in an email that recent attacks on Indian students in Australia are the work of others in the Indian community, not of white Australians.

He claims most of the attacks have been on Sikhs, and white Australians wouldn't know how to target them.

Be interesting to find out how many attacks were actually on Sikhs, and of those that were, how many of those were on male Sikhs observing Sikh religious dress (head coverings and steel wristbands, which many ignorant people might mistake for Islamic dress).

Nasrallah also sucks up to reactionary Australians by saying he's never faced racism, and he's dark-skinned too, so that pretty much goes to prove racism isn't a problem. Of course, many other dark-skinned people living in Australia would say that they have come across racism here, despite Nasrallah's Nalliah's experience.

The full email is below:


Are Killings from within?

The debate over whether Australia is a racist country has been renewed in the wake of the murdered three year old Indian boy in Melbourne overnight
with Catch the Fire ministries president Pastor Daniel Nalliah suggesting the slayings perpetrated against the Sikh
community might come from fellow countrymen from their country of origin.

As police in Melbourne hunt for the killer of three-year-old Gurshan Sing Channa, Pastor Daniel Nalliah, who is darker skinned and hails from Sri
Lanka, said many would see Australia as a racist country with 'yet another tragic death of an Indian in Australia'.

"I think we need to take a good look at the recent spate of attacks on mainly Indians from a Sikh background. The whole world seems to believe Australia is rampant with racism. Darker skinned people are even scared to
travel to Australia," Pastor Daniel said.

"My question is, if the attacks are from Whites against blacks, then we all will be possibly on the receiving end but how come the attacks are so clearly on one group of people - the Sikhs from India?"

Pastor Daniel argues that people from within the same coloured group are much more likely to recognise their own coloured people faster since they
would be familiar with their accents, nuances in the language, etc.

"One needs to ask the question, Why is it that most attacks are on mainly Indians from the Sikh community and not on everyone who has the same coloured skin?"

"Is the Media helping solve the problem or are they giving the wrong message and blowing it out of proportion since some media reports would make some
people think it's a case of Racism from white people against black. At least that's the message being conveyed locally and globally.

Pastor Nalliah, who has travelled to many nations and ministered to
thousands of people as a Minister of the Gospel of Jesus Christ, said he has "certainly never faced racism in Australia over the past 13 years I have lived here and I have darker skin too" he said.

"Why then are most of the attacks on one particular group only, the Sikhs? We need to understand that a non Asian will not know the difference between Cambodian, Vietnamese, Chinese, Singaporean or Malaysian until they really get to know them personally as a friend.

"Likewise those from Sri Lanka, India, Pakistan, Bangladesh all look very much alike, in a similar vein to people from New Zealand, Australia or England.

"I believe these attacks should not be looked at as necessarily white against black, but rather it could very well be a group of people from within the same countries of origin where the victims came from who are
carrying out these attacks.

We pray that these senseless attacks and killings will stop and the culprits be brought to justice.

Posted via email from @djackmanson

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